Mama C: Urban Warrior in the African Bush will screen at the International Black Womans’ Film Festival, Oct. 25-27, 2013.

“Essential viewing for anthropologists, historians, and sociologists and courses in Women’s Studies, Africana Studies and Diaspora studies.” Robyn C. Spencer, Asst. Professor of History, Lehman College

The film explores Mama C’s decade’s long project of coming to terms with who she is—an African American raised in Kansas City, KS, the “jazz-capital of the world,” who has lived most of her life in Africa, the place from where her ancestors were forced to make the “middle-passage.” When she first arrived in Tanzania she tried as hard as she could to “fit in,” wearing khangas, carrying my babies on my back, basket on my head, chewing sugar cane sticks.” As she writes in one of her published poems, “In my freshly-landed, just-got-off-the-boat enthusiasm of living in Africa, I tried to blend, to melt, homogenize, disappear, erase, the essence of what made me who I am, an African, who grew up in and was molded by the ‘hoods’ of America, and I almost lost myself, self.”